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A selection of recent updates about the impact of plastics on the environment and possible solutions

Nielsen's survey results showed consumers' increasing willingness to purchase sustainably around the globe

“In 2015, polling group Nielsen surveyed 30,000 people in 60 countries around the world. They wanted to know what influences the way consumers feel about brands – and how those feelings impact buying behaviour.

The survey found that two-thirds of respondents would happily pay more for sustainable goods.”

Source: world economic forum website https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/09/sustainability-is-now-mission-critical-for-businesses-heres-why/


“Recent success in reducing carrier bag (PE) and drinks bottles (PET) waste in Europe suggests lifestyle adjustments are possible, but plastic is ingrained in modern society and a future free from plastic seems unlikely. Complete alteration of human behaviour is difficult to attain, as indicated by the fact that only 9% of plastic waste is recycled3. Therefore in addition to these three solutions to the plastic waste problem (reducing, reusing and recycling), we need a fundamental change in order to make a noticeable impact on the plastic waste seeping into our environment. A new plastic future in which biodegradable polymers replace conventional plastics could be the answer.”
source: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-04565-2


Some bacteria think plastic is fantastic
Bacteria isolated from outside a bottle-recycling facility can break down and metabolize plastic. The proliferation of plastics in consumer products, from bottles to clothing, has resulted in the release of countless tons of plastics into the environment.
Yoshida et al. show how the biodegradation of plastics by specialized bacteria could be a viable bioremediation strategy (see the Perspective by Bornscheuer).
The new species. Ideonella sakaiensis, breaks down the plastic by using two
enzymes to hydrolyze PET and a primary reaction intermediate, eventually yielding basic building blocks for growth.”

Source: Science. p. 1196: See also p. 1154 – Bacteria found near a plastics recycling plant can degrade plastic


Source: https://ourworldindata.org/plastic-pollution


Thanks www.trillionsgmbh.com for the sources


ReverteTM  is an oxo-biodegradable additive which is added directly into the film manufacturing process to standard PE, PP & PET to impart this property, with almost no physical impact on the processing of the polymer.”

Oxo-Biodegradable polymers

“These polymers undergo controlled degradation through the incorporation of a ‘prodegradant’ additive (an additive that can trigger and accelerate the degradation process). These polymers undergo accelerated oxidative defined degradation initiated by natural daylight, heat and/or mechanical stress, and embrittle in the environment and erode under the influence of weathering.Reverte™ produces a plastic product with equivalent performance characteristics than the present non-degradables, is cost competitive and results in a product will totally and harmlessly disintegrate in multiple environments, commencing at a predetermined time.”

Source: https://www.bioplastics.com.sg/faqs



https://www.fairphone.com/en/

Fairphone is designed for a circular life-cycle, because every component can be replaced, plus it utilizes recycled plastic.


Adidas is using 20% of recycled plastic for its shoes and garments


Food companies trying to reduce their consumption of plastic have a big problem — it’s hard to find suitable recycled material. Nestlé says it’s willing to spend more than $2 billion to try and fix that.

The world’s biggest foodcompany said in a statement Thursday that it would cut costs in other parts of its business to free up more than 1.5 billion Swiss francs ($1.6 billion) to buy 2 million metric tons of recycled plastic between now and 2025.

Nestlé said it would be paying above the market rate for the recycled material, part of its strategy to alleviate a shortage of used plastics suitable for food packaging by luring new suppliers into the business. Doing so shouldhelp the company meet its goal of reducing its use of virgin plastics by a third by 2025.

“Making recycled plastics safe for food is an enormous challenge for our industry,” Mark Schneider, chief executive of Nestlé, said in a statement.

“That is why in addition to minimizing plastics use and collecting waste, we want to close the loop and make more plastics infinitely recyclable,” he added

Source: https://ktvz.com/money/2020/01/17/nestle-is-spending-billions-to-create-a-market-for-recycled-plastics/


 “The vision of INDIANES is that banana fiber is the solution to the environmental crisis caused by the textile and fashion industry. Banana fiber was used for centuries by Colombian communities and does not require any water or extension of land for cultivation, since it is obtained from the residues of banana agriculture.”


“Mattel announced its goal to achieve 100% recycled, recyclable or bio-based plastics materials in both its products and packaging by 2030.

This new goal expands the Company’s Environmental Sustainable Sourcing Principles that were announced in 2011. The Company now sources 93% of the paper and wood fiber used in its packaging and products from recycled or Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) content, surpassing its 2018 goal of 90%. In addition, the Company has adopted the How2Recycle label, a standardized labeling system that clearly communicates recycling instructions to the public.”

Source: Mattel Announces Goal to Achieve 100% Recycled, Recyclable or Bio-based Plastic Materials in All Products and Packaging By 2030


“As soon as we’d received the Generation 1 shoes, we were able to start Phase 2. We collected the shoes, recycled them, kept them in our supply chain and ultimately remade the recycled material into new running shoe components. The material is melted and developed into new pellets, which are heated to form new components including the eyelets and outsole. Virgin TPU material is used to create the remaining components of the midsole and upper. The remade and new materials are fused together to create Generation 2: a running shoe in a blue colourway, that remains one material and is still 100% recyclable for the next generation. So, this is where we are today: launching the next generation of FUTURECRAFT.LOOP and one step closer to a consumer reality – all in the space of just eight months. A first for adidas”.  

https://news.adidas.com/running/futurecraft.loop-phase-2–how-we-re-finding-away/s/43c42bf2-73ca-4ccb-930b-5ac5b6637a76